Autor: Jake Bellissimo

The Milgram Experiment was an influencing factor on ethics in modern-day psychology 0

Art as an Excuse? Ethics in New Music

In Alex Temple’s article “Composers, performers, and consent”, she talks about something seldom spoken of in new music: a composer’s relationship to their performers with regards to writing music that is also sustainable for the people performing them. She cites an interaction that Jessica Aszodi had with a composer in...

Buchtitel Ernst Jünger 0

Die unerwünschte Verbindung zwischen Musik und Nationalismus (Gastartikel von Jake Bellissimo)

Kultur- und Kunstkonservierung ist ein ganz anderes Thema als Nationalismus, und das ist das, was sehr erschreckend an den erwähnten Gesetzen ist. Die Steuerung von Kunst und Kultur ist einer der ersten Schritte auf dem Weg zum Faschismus, und es hat nie funktioniert.

World of Echo—a 30th anniversary love letter (guest article by Jake Bellissimo) 0

World of Echo—a 30th anniversary love letter (guest article by Jake Bellissimo)

The awkwardly rhythmic intro to “Tone Bone Kone” greets me as I drowsily open my eyes and let out a huge yawn. I realize that I accidentally fell asleep with my phone on shuffle, but unlock my phone to turn off shuffle and listen to the rest of the album.

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Money to Mouths, Morals to Music? (Article by Jake Bellissimo)

I understand that labor requires recognition and music is already a scene where artists struggle to get paid, but that doesn’t give us an excuse to not understand how we play a role in that system. By giving Woody Allen my money, am I acknowledging a good artist or instead saying that him being a quirky, good person in his art excuses his persona in real life?

On the Subject of Trans Voices (by Jake Bellissimo) 0

On the Subject of Trans Voices (by Jake Bellissimo)

This issue is present across the board in music, but it has a special position in art music. Unlike many other genres and practices (whose definition of gender is mainly informed by societal prejudices), art music has a well-accepted history of distorting the role of gender in vocal analysis alongside (but still intertwined with) cultural progress.